Entries by Jeff MacKnight

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Practicing Love Sermon Series: This Fall at St. Dunstan's

Posted 6:27 PM by
 
Join us for the 10:45 a.m. Sunday service to hear sermons on many situations in which we need to practice love - even when it's difficult! If you can't make the service, look on our website for these sermons. 
 
 
Sept 11 - Practicing Love when we are Lost (Luke 15:1-10)
Sept 18 - Practicing Love with our Money (Luke 16:1-13)
Sept 25 - Practicing Love with our Money, redux! (Luke 16:19-31)
Oct 2 -  Practicing Love with by remaining Faithful (Luke 17:5-10)
Oct 9 -  Practicing Love with Thanksgiving (Luke 17:11-19)
Oct 16 -  Practicing Love by doing Justice (Luke 18:1-18)
Oct 23 -  Practicing Love in Humility (Luke 18:9-14)
Oct 30 -  Practicing Love through Repentance (Luke 19:1-10)
 
The New York Times (Nicholas Kristoff, Sunday, September 4 edition) ran an article on the kind of religion Jesus would practice.  The author Brian McLaren asked, "Could Christians migrate from defining their faith as a system of beliefs to expressing it as aloving way of life?"
 
St. Dunstan's is well on our way to doing just that:  Love Practiced Here.  


 

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Worship for the Fourth of July

Posted 4:18 PM by
 
Sunday, July 3, 2016 9:00 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.

Celebrate the goodness of America, and God's call to us.
 
We'll teach the kids to sing "God Bless America" at 9:00 a.m.!
Enjoy patriotic hymns and trumpet at 10:45 a.m.!
 
Gabe Slesinger- Guest Trumpet Player
Gabe Slesinger graduated from Rice University in May, 2016, with a degree in trumpet performance. A Pyle and Whitman graduate, Gabe won first prize at the 2012 National Trumpet Competition and has also performed with the Houston Symphony. He is very grateful for the generosity of St. Dunstan's in allowing him to use the church space for practice and recordings.


 

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July Summer Book Group

Posted 2:41 PM by
Jeff MacKnight will lead a discussion of two recent, notable books on two Sundays, July 17th and 23rd, from 9:50-10:35 a.m. in the parish hall: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates, and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot. These much talked about books both touch on the African-American experience, and the ways human beings can ignore, exploit, and mistreat other human beings. Coates writes an open letter to his 15- year -old son, about being a black male. Skloot tells the story of a woman whose cells were harvested, multiplied, and spread around the world, without her knowledge or consent. Feel free to drop in on these discussions. 
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In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men-bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates's attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. 

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells-taken without her knowledge in 1951-became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can't afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew. 

 
Watch the remake of the TV documentary Roots to provide additional background as we consider race in America. 


 

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Summer Book Group in July

Posted 2:55 PM by

Jeff MacKnight will lead a discussion of two recent, notable books on two Sundays, July 17th and 23rd, from 9:50-10:35 a.m. in the parish hall: Between the World and Me by TaNehisi Coates, and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot. These much talked about books both touch on the African-American experience, and the ways human beings can ignore, exploit, and mistreat other human beings. Coates writes an open letter to his 15- year -old son, about being a black male. Skloot tells the story of a woman whose cells were harvested, multiplied, and spread around the world, without her knowledge or consent. Feel free to drop in on these discussions. 

************************************************************

In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men-bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates's attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. 

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells-taken without her knowledge in 1951-became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can't afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew. 


 
The current remake of the TV documentary Roots provides additional background as we consider race in America. 


 

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The New Garden

Posted 4:55 PM by
 
A big thank you to all who helped plant the new garden. It looks spectacular! And doing it together made it a lot of fun. Thanks especially to Rosemarie and Sue for organizing, feeding, and leading us. Lee Surut is looking down and smiling....

Peace, Jeff
 


 

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Glimpses of Holy Week

Posted 4:53 PM by

 

7:30 p.m. Good Friday, March 25
 
Cross + Candles + Prayer + Song
 
The quiet night in the garden is interrupted by soldiers and the authorities, who take Jesus away. Before daybreak he has stood trial, been whipped and mocked by the soldiers, and is condemned. Like a common criminal Jesus is hung on a cross and dies an agonizing death. He is taken down from the cross and laid in a tomb and sealed with a stone.
 
What now? The expectations of those who have believed that he was the one have been crushed. Jesus' companions, who scattered following his crucifixion, have gathered in the upper room again. They quietly sing songs of lament and offer prayer to God and light a
candle - seeking the way forward and waiting ...
 
 
7:30 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter
Fire+Water+Story+Bread & Wine
 
We arrive at church in the twilight Saturday night, in a mood of expectation.  The new fire of Easter is kindled and shared - each of us carrying that New Light of Christ with us.  We hear the
stories of God's great saving acts in history as we sit around the fire outside.
 

With ancient chant, we move into the parish hall where water is our theme - life-giving, cleansing, refreshing water.  

Finally, we approach the church and knock on the doors to be admitted into Resurrection.  The lights blaze, the flowers abound, and Easter comes once more - in our Baptismal vows and in the bread and wine of Communion.  We go on our way rejoicing, singing Alleluia!
 
Easter Vigil Reflection
Easter Vigil is my preferred Easter celebration. I like it because I see the time between Maundy Thursday and Easter as a time to reflect on what it would be like without the church, without Christ, without God in my life; as well as without the life of the Christian community. Easter Vigil celebrates the end of our wandering in the spiritual wilderness. After having Christ taken from us, the Easter Vigil service brings the light back to the community, a reminder of caring nature of God, and the resilience of Christ. St. Dunstan's ceremony, starting in the memorial garden around a fire and bringing the light into the church, is a great way to reflect, a time to celebrate the life of Christ and our life in communion with Christ.

Thomas Vander Wal
 
 
 

 

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All Saints' Day- This Sunday

Posted 6:31 PM by
 
Remembrances for All Saints' Sunday, November 1.
Please submit you names by 8:00 a.m. 10/30/2015.

The feast of All Saints celebrates the communion of saints in all times and places - on earth and in heaven.  As you receive the bread and wine of the Eucharist, rest in the knowledge that you remain connected in love with all who have died.  I find much comfort in that. 

On this day we remember by name all those dear departed whose names you submit to the church office beforehand. Please use the paper slips or the online form to submit your loved ones for remembrance by 8:00 a.m., Friday, October 30.  
 
All Saints is also a day for baptisms into the Church, which is the visible community of saints on earth.  With great joy, we shall baptize children into this communion of saints at 9 a.m. on November 1, and at 10:45 a.m. on November 8
Jeff MacKnight
 


 

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November 1 is All Saint's Sunday!

Posted 3:42 PM by
  
Remembrances for All Saints' Sunday, November 1.

The feast of All Saints celebrates the communion of saints in all times and places - on earth and in heaven.  As you receive the bread and wine of the Eucharist, rest in the knowledge that you remain connected in love with all who have died.  I find much comfort in that. 

On this day we remember by name all those dear departed whose names you submit to the church office beforehand. Please use the paper slips or the online form to submit your loved ones for remembrance.  
 
All Saints is also a day for baptisms into the Church, which is the visible community of saints on earth.  With great joy, we shall baptize children into this communion of saints at 9 a.m. on November 1, and at 10:45 a.m. on November 8. 
Jeff MacKnight
 


 

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All Saints' Day

Posted 6:09 PM by
 
 
Remembrances for All Saints' Sunday, November 1.

The feast of All Saints celebrates the communion of saints in all times and places - on earth and in heaven.  As you receive the bread and wine of the Eucharist, rest in the knowledge that you remain connected in love with all who have died.  I find much comfort in that. 

On this day we remember by name all those dear departed whose names you submit to the church office beforehand. Please use the paper slips or the online form to submit your loved ones for remembrance.  
 
All Saints is also a day for baptisms into the Church, which is the visible community of saints on earth.  With great joy, we shall baptize children into this communion of saints at 9 a.m. on November 1, and at 10:45 a.m. on November 8
Jeff MacKnight
 


 

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All Saint's Remberances

Posted 6:38 PM by

 

 
 
Remembrances for All Saints' Sunday, November 1.

The feasts of All Saint's celebrates the communion of saints in all times and places - on earth and in heaven.  As you receive the bread and wine of the Eucharist, rest in the knowledge that you remain connected in love with all who have died.  I find much comfort in that. 

On this day we remember by name all those dear departed whose names you submit to the church office beforehand. Please use the paper slips or the online form to submit your loved ones for remembrance.  
 
All Saints is also a day for baptisms into the Church, which is the visible community of saints on earth.  With great joy, we shall baptize children into this communion of saints at 9 a.m. on November 1, and at 10:45 a.m. on November 8

 

Jeff MacKnight
 

 

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